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Friday, November 11, 2016

Poll: Half of America Can’t Afford More Than $100 a Month on Health Insurance Millennials feeling extra pinch on health costs

More than half of Americans—52.5 percent—say they cannot afford to spend more than $100 a month on health insurance premiums, according to a poll from HealthPocket, a technology company that compares health plans.

The group asked survey respondents at the beginning of open enrollment what was the highest monthly premium they could afford to pay for health insurance in 2017.

More than half of respondents said $100 a month or less, while 15.9 percent said they could afford to spend $200 a month.

Just over 11 percent said they could afford $300 a month, 5.5 percent said they could afford $400 a month, and 4.8 percent said they could spend $500 a month, while and 9.8 percent said they could afford $500 or more.

“Double-digit rate increases for people purchasing insurance in the Affordable Care Act market has renewed questions regarding what people can afford to pay for coverage,” the survey states.

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6 comments:

Anonymous said...

$100 per month equals $12,000 over ten years.

One surgical procedure could wipe that out.

Who pays?

I am sick (no pun intended) over my 60% increase in premiums for next year - 0ver $600/month expected. But if the doctors, nurses and other providers need to get paid and the pharmaceutical companies want their profits, where else will the money come from?

The insurance companies are not in this for fun. It's highly profitable.

Food for thought: We think nothing of spending $300/mo for a car but taking care of our health should cost less?

Anonymous said...

Whatever, my friggin bill is $800/month with a 2500 deductible
OR I could choose the $480/month with a 6500 deductible
Either way it is 10K+ a year.

So what's the point of having it?

I do not make enough to cover it.

Anonymous said...

When I look at my $12,000 copay, it scares me. That's a third of my salary before taxes. Where will I come up with that kind of money besides borrowing it? And if I'm too sick to work, or can't work because I'm recovering, what then?

Anonymous said...

If you get sick and you don't pay for the care, who does?

tanstaafl

(There ain't no such thing as a free lunch).

Look at where the money goes to figure out where the savings are. Hint: It's not the caregivers.

Anonymous said...

I think most people can manage a bit more than $100 a month. Three or four hundred is another story. No matter what, we need to address medical costs.

Anonymous said...

Yea but I bet none of these people complain about the 200 dollar a month cell phone bill.