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Friday, February 10, 2012

Group Forces Congressional Hearing On Big Sis’ Twitter, Drudge Spying

A privacy advocacy group has swayed Congress to hold a hearing next week into the Department of Homeland Security’s practice of monitoring social networks such as Twitter and Facebook, as well as media reports and organizations, including The Drudge Report.


The Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC) recently obtained close to 300 pages of documents, as a result of a Freedom of Information Act lawsuit, detailing the federal agency’s “intelligence gathering” practices on the web.


Among the documents were guidelines from DHS instructing outside contractors to monitor the web for media reports and comments that “reflect adversely” on the agency or the federal government.


As Reuters reported last month, in early 2010 contractors were asked to spend 24 hours monitoring news media coverage on popular websites, including Facebook, Twitter, Hulu, WikiLeaks, as well as news sites including the Huffington Post and The Drudge Report.


The contractors were required to provide the DHS with feedback on any potential “threats and hazards”, as well as “any media reports that reflect adversely on the U.S. Government and the Department of Homeland Security (D.H.S.) ability to prevent, protect and respond, to recovery efforts or activities related to any crisis or events which impact National Planning Scenarios.”
The documents also state that the program should highlight “both positive and negative reports on FEMA, C.I.A., C.B.P., ICE, etc., as well as organizations outside of D.H.S.”


The documents obtained by EPIC indicate that following the exercise, a procurement official awarded an $11.3 million contract to General Dynamics Advanced Information Systems in order to carry out the monitoring on a “24/7/365 basis”.


EPIC director Ginger McCall notes that monitoring what people are saying about government policies goes too far and has a chilling effect on free speech.


“The Department of Homeland Security’s monitoring of political dissent has no legal basis and is contrary to core First Amendment principles,” she said.


“The language in the documents makes it quite clear that they are looking for media reports that are critical of the agency and the U.S. government more broadly,” said McCall. “This is entirely outside of the bounds of the agency’s statutory duties.”


More here

2 comments:

Anonymous said...

Cool

Anonymous said...

as an NSA trained security specialist before the internet went public now working in the private sector I can tell you there is nothing free or altruistic about it
it was launched publicly with very clear intent
it is no bastion of free speech and no frontier of alternative media if was field tested and known to be commerce friendly but also a very effective surveillance tool
the same tags and cross references used to launch sites blogs and commerce are used the very same way to observe YOU
back in the day it was an ongoing joke that we could make an unheard of black man president and we did the same way american votes for a pop idol
you had better think again if you think this is any frontier or alternative media
LOL it is CB radio at its best unless you know how to write code and hack the back scene and track and project movements