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Wednesday, November 30, 2016

Young rugby players who suffer head impacts could undergo changes in their brains

Youngsters who suffer head impacts in sports like rugby and American football undergo changes in their brains after a single season, say scientists.

Scans of high school American footballer players, aged under 18, found alterations in the grey and white matter in their brains that had been caused by the collisions.

Researchers said the findings related to all contact sports - and it is now important to discover if there are long-term effects.

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5 comments:

Anonymous said...

It doesn't take a brain surgeon to understand that repeatedly hitting a person in the head could produce brain damage. After the concussion studies on football players, the kid-rugby brain damage connection is not a surprise in any way, except that it seems to be slow on the realization.

Anonymous said...

here is a strange concept. you play the game you realize the dangers. if you don't like the possible injury DON'T PLAY THE GAME. go away pc police. you are already ruining football

Anonymous said...

We don't need or want Government protection from games we choose to play.

Anonymous said...

8:28 AM - good luck with that.

Anonymous said...

All contact sports come with risk, and when minor children are involved it is a parents' responsibility to evaluate those risks and react accordingly. Having the Government involved in any way is over reach. Unfortunately I have seen far too many parents vicariously living out their dreams at the expense of their children, and this poor parenting is a large part of this issue. Comments of 'support' to "walk it off", "man up", or other such gibberish when a young athlete has been injured are just what I am speaking of. I know that there is a prevailing sentiment that this sort of activity "makes boys men" and makes them tough. It does not - It makes them ignore obvious signs of injury that could have significant (and possibly fatal) impact.