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Monday, November 28, 2016

Here's What Happened When Ancient Romans Tried To 'Drain The Swamp'

In late January of the year 98 AD, after decades of turmoil, instability, inflation, and war, Romans welcomed a prominent solider named Trajan as their new Emperor.

Prior to Trajan, Romans had suffered immeasurably, from the madness of Nero to the ruthless autocracy of Domitian, to the chaos of 68-69 AD when, in the span of twelve months, Rome saw four separate emperors.

Trajan was welcome relief and was generally considered by his contemporaries to be among the finest emperors in Roman history.

Trajan’s successors included Hadrian and Marcus Aurelius, both of whom were also were also reputed as highly effective rulers.

But that was pretty much the end of Rome’s good luck.

The Roman Empire’s enlightened rulers may have been able to make some positive changes and delay the inevitable, but they could not prevent it.

Rome still had far too many systemic problems.

The cost of administering such a vast empire was simply too great. There were so many different layers of governments—imperial, provincial, local—and the upkeep was debilitating.

Rome had also installed costly infrastructure and created expensive social welfare programs like the alimenta, which provided free grain to the poor.

Not to mention, endless wars had taken their toll on public finances.

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3 comments:

Anonymous said...

Sounds familiar.

Anonymous said...

let's pray and believe most of this swamp can be drained. maybe after 8 years this could be done.

Anonymous said...

Trump is going to run into a brick wall of resistance from all of the long time members of congress who have gotten rich wallowing in the muck for years.