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Saturday, May 20, 2017

LEGENDARY COMMENTS BY GEORGE CHEVALLIER 5-20-17


LUNCH TREAT

Back in the mid-1950’s, “fast food” was nowhere to be found in Salisbury. If someone went out to eat, it was always a special occasion. And you dressed accordingly. There were an assortment of luncheonettes and diners for the working trade to patronize at lunchtime if they didn’t go home for lunch or pack it to take to work. At the diners and luncheonettes, the lunch-time fare was usually a hot roast beef or turkey sandwich or the ever popular grilled cheese sandwich.
          
In 1956, when I was attending St. Francis de Sales School, I made the discovery of a lifetime – the submarine sandwich. I had attained a level of trust with my parents to the point where I could ride my bicycle to school one day a week. Traffic was not as horrific as it is now and the idea of anyone taking your bicycle was unheard of.  Of course, it had a City of Salisbury license plate, which was a 2” x 3” piece of metal embossed with a number which was registered by the City and issued only to you. It was attached to the rear of the seat with a metal band and you just knew that it provided all the security you would need. This was before the bad guys discovered bolt cutters.
          
So, every Thursday at lunch time, I rode my bicycle to that magical place, Sid’s Subs. It was located on S. Division St.near the hospital, not far from St. Francis. And, so, for 30 minutes and less than a dollar, I savored that marvel of culinary art, the cold cut sub. It was washed down with a cold orange drink. I don’t remember having to make many decisions about what kind I wanted or how I wanted it fixed. Sid Niblett made one kind and it was fairly scrumptious to me. The whole jumble of cold cuts, cheese, lettuce, tomato, onions and oil was a far cry from the usual orderly sandwiches my Mother used to make. The whole experience was a transition in my life and I have never forsaken my love of a good cold cut sub.

13 comments:

Anonymous said...

Sid's were the best...they were also on poppy seed rolls. Would love to have one today!!!
Remember how narrow S. Division was
then?

Anonymous said...

I was born in the 60's & I remember there being a lunch place near the hospital, but I don't remember the name Sid's. I think as the hospital expanded, they moved across the highway to where Peninsula Cardiology is now. I also loved The Hut.

Anonymous said...

9:26-I think that was L&F Sub Shop by the hospital.I personally don't recall Sid's

Anonymous said...

i remember sid's subs and the original hut with carolyn. wow were they ever wonderful. the subs at sids were the best and the hut made the best pizza burgers and fries in the world.

there was also L & F subs. seems to me there was another sub shop, but i can't remember the name.

thanks again for memory lane...

Anonymous said...

Not fast food,but loved the Saddle Club downtown. Such a quaint place.

Anonymous said...

OMG, George, I was reading this and you wrote so I felt like I was reliving it, right down to feeling that cold sub in my mouth!

Anonymous said...

10:03-Basement restaurants like The Saddle Club did quite well in Salisbury.I recall a total of four. There was also one under Reed's,one under the Wicomico Hotel,and one under the bldg next to the Chamber of Commerce.I asked the Saddle club owner if I could buy their street sign when they closed(a neon sign with a horse on it).Someone else got it.

Anonymous said...

In the basement of one plaza east (wicomico hotel) was chez jean pierre
good people

Jim said...

Actually, K-Mart used to have pretty good subs too. And they were cheap.

By 'good', I don't mean like Sid's, but very tasty for the price.

Anonymous said...

Now all dabury has is gay welfare arts buildings at pennies on the tax payers $ great work jake Ireton.

Anonymous said...

Back in the 1960's, before the county had a central kitchen, Pocomoke High School had all lunch food made on premises by a few local ladies. Every Tuesday was sub day. Of course, everything was fresh that day, but the roll was splayed open and piled so high with meat, cheese, lettuce, tomatoes and onions that it couldn't be closed. It was a chore just to get it inside one's mouth. We'll never see days like that again.

Anonymous said...

That same cold cut is still available at The Red Door, its called the "RED DOOR SPECIAL" it is an awesome sub, takes me two days to devour a large and I am not a small person....its packed!!!

Anonymous said...

Still miss L&F sub shop. RIP, John.