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Saturday, November 26, 2016

Notice How They're Always Liberals Too


8 comments:

Anonymous said...

That and the fact that Hillary is not in prison.

Anonymous said...

And there's your sign, it's a much different standard for ordinary individuals.

Anonymous said...

Bill Clinton was impeached and stayed in office.

Anonymous said...

Clinton was impeached for lying to a Grand jury not texting a little girl. The only reason he wasn't removed was because the Democrats controlled the Senate.

Anonymous said...

The Democratic-controlled Congress ruled to allow Clinton to stay in office. There will be many disappointed Trump voters if he lets Hillary slide, especially after all the trouble her followers are now causing.

Anonymous said...

Do a google search. There are plenty of disgraced republican politicians. Many were closet gays and involved with young boys.

Unknown said...

The impeachment of Bill Clinton, the 42nd President of the United States, was initiated by the House of Representatives on two charges, one of perjury and one of obstruction of justice, on December 19, 1998. The charges stemmed from his extramarital affair with former White House Intern Monica Lewinsky and his testimony about the affair during a sexual harassment lawsuit filed against him by Paula Jones. Clinton was subsequently acquitted of these charges by the Senate on February 12, 1999.[1] Two other impeachment articles – a second perjury charge and a charge of abuse of power – failed in the House.
44 Bill Clinton 3x4.jpg This article is part of a series
about
Bill Clinton
Electoral history Political positions
Governor of Arkansas
Governorship 1992 Democratic primary
President of the United States
First term
Campaign for the Presidency 1992
1st inauguration Presidency NAFTA
Health Security Act 1994 midterm Economic policy Travelgate Whitewater AmeriCorps Dayton Agreement
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v t e
The Independent Counsel, Ken Starr, turned over documentation to the House Judiciary Committee. The Chief Prosecutor, David Schippers, and his team reviewed the material and determined there was sufficient evidence to impeach the president. As a result, four charges were considered by the full House of Representatives; two passed, making Clinton the second president to be impeached, after Andrew Johnson in 1868, and only the third against whom articles of impeachment had been brought before the full House for consideration (Richard Nixon resigned from the presidency in 1974, while an impeachment process against him was underway).
The trial in the United States Senate began right after the seating of the 106th Congress, in which the Republican Party began with 55 senators. A two-thirds vote (67 senators) was required to remove Clinton from office. Fifty senators voted to remove Clinton on the obstruction of justice charge and 45 voted to remove him on the perjury charge; no member of his own Democratic Party voted guilty on either charge. Clinton, like Johnson a century earlier, was acquitted on all charges.

Anonymous said...

They are not done with this sick person yet.