Friday, October 07, 2016

Police tracking social media during protests stirs concerns

DENVER (AP) — Increasingly common tools that allow police to conduct real-time social media surveillance during protests are drawing criticism from civil liberties advocates, who oppose the way some departments have quietly unrolled the technology without community input and little public explanation.

Police say services such as Geofeedia, which map, collect and store information from social media posts, are a powerful way to help find crime witnesses, spot brewing problems during large gatherings and gauge community sentiment.

Groups like the American Civil Liberties Union say the software can be easily used to collect information on peaceful protesters or target certain groups. The programs let police gather and record all online posts within specific geographic boundaries, and some allow users to do keyword searches for certain words or hashtags.

Law enforcement agencies have used the services to mine posts on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube and other sites during parades, protests and other large events.



Anonymous said...

And Blogs.

Anonymous said...

They only need to track George Soros' social media.

Anonymous said...

Don't make your posts public. That's how most of this info gets scoured, because there's no expectation of privacy.

Anonymous said...

Look up patriot act and you will change your mind. Obama made it law after promising he wouldn't. Clinton voted YES.