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Monday, March 26, 2012

Facebook Agrees: Employers Should Definitely Not Be Asking For Your Passwords

We weren't the only ones shocked to find out that employers have been asking job applicants or in some cases, actual workers, for the passwords to their Facebook, Twitter and other social media accounts. Facebook has issued a statement addressing that practice, calling it "alarming."

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8 comments:

Anonymous said...

Wow, for me, this is waaaay too simple. As an employer, I think it's a great idea to ask a prospective employee for their personal onformation.

Their response to such a request would speak volumes about their character and their self respect.

Anyone willing to give away their own privacy would have no qualms about giving away my company's secrets, recipies, or any other secure information that makes my company stand above the rest. They would also never respect the privacy of my customers, which is of paramount importance.

They would certainly not be allowed to work for me! I will add this to my interview question list immediately!

Anonymous said...

I guess I will never get a job if someone asks me this.

Anonymous said...

Personally, I could never understand why anyone would document things about themself that they didn't want others to know.

Anonymous said...

So let me see if I understand this correctly? You plan on asking perspective employees what their passwords are to social media sites. And if they give you the info you will not give them the job! What a douche bag! As for me if a prospective employer asked me that question I would stop the interview and tell them that it is very unprofessional! I would NEVER work for such an individual who would try to intimidate people like this! Is this how you run your business? Trying to “trip” up your employees? I feel sorry for your employees. A person who is going to an interview is nervous enough not to be harassed by a question that is as inappropriate at this. Before you start wondering if I am just a wacko without a job! I have worked in the defense industry as a professional for over 30 years and held a DOD Top Secret clearance during all that time! So it’s not whether or not I have the integrity you are looking for, do you have the integrity to be a good boss? If you are so concerned, why not just subject them to a poly? I have to take a poly every year to keep my clearance.

Anonymous said...

Polygraphs and other testing is expensive. Direct questions are free, and your answers are priceless! And if you wish to know if I have the integrity to be a good boss, bring your own questions to the interview!

I've interviewed many who know everything anout everything and can "do it All", that is until I hire them. Then they become "specialists"!

Take your DOD Top Secret Clearance and use it to work for the government, not to bash others with.

Anonymous said...

I do believe that asking a personal question like this is an invasion of privacy. In this economy I believe that many people would give this information because the position is so badly needed. Does it mean that this is something they would be willing to do all the time? No I think not. But if you are a potential candidate and feel that this may prevent you from furthering yourself what would you do? Take for instance you have a family and children that need to be fed and provided for : Do you A. Give a simply password (that you can change immediately) or B. Say no and miss out on an opportunity... Think about it, obviously you run the business and are a far cry from living paycheck to paycheck and may fail to see this perspective of survival. Choosing A or B, does that make the person untrustworthy? Does it may them unmanageable or rebellious, because they refused? Or does it make them honorable?

Addressing why people post things they don't want others to see: Facebook for the mature is in fact a social website amongst their FRIENDS. Obviously I will say many things to my friends that I would not to my supervisor. Why? Because they are my FRIENDS! I'm not saying post drunken pictures or lewd photos but what about private messages that are exchanged on Facebook. What about posts of me complaining of hating my job or my boss. These are private thoughts between myself and all of my FRIENDS, that does not need to be shared with my employer.

Anonymous said...

I would give mine up right after I got the password of the employer and the person that was going to use it. LOL that would be sensational to say they least

Anonymous said...

Keep in mind, if you do give your password, you are not only releasing your own personal information, but the personal information of your friends as well. When you have access to your friends' info, photos, etc, your friend is trusting it is only accessible by you (and others on their friends list). If someone other than you is looking at that info, you are violating the trust of your friends.