Pages

Tuesday, November 01, 2016

Attorney General Lynch 'Pleads Fifth' on Secret Iran 'Ransom' Payments

Attorney General Loretta Lynch is declining to comply with an investigation by leading members of Congress about the Obama administration’s secret efforts to send Iran $1.7 billion in cash earlier this year, prompting accusations that Lynch has “pleaded the Fifth” Amendment to avoid incriminating herself over these payments, according to lawmakers and communications exclusively obtained by theWashington Free Beacon.

Sen. Marco Rubio (R., Fla.) and Rep. Mike Pompeo (R., Kan.) initially presented Lynch in October with a series of questions about how the cash payment to Iran was approved and delivered.

In an Oct. 24 response, Assistant Attorney General Peter Kadzik responded on Lynch’s behalf, refusing to answer the questions and informing the lawmakers that they are barred from publicly disclosing any details about the cash payment, which was bound up in a ransom deal aimed at freeing several American hostages from Iran.

More

8 comments:

Anonymous said...

Killary has a very deep bench at the DOJ :(

lmclain said...

The ATTORNEY GENERAL OF THE UNITED STATES (!!) has refused to answer questions about what she knows about the distribution of 1.7 BILLION dollars of OUR MONEY?!

She has forgotten her place.

Keep cheering!

Anonymous said...

And if Elected, Hillary will offer her a vacancy on the Supreme Court.

Anonymous said...

Dirty Democrat garbage again!

Robert said...

Every time one of these people plead the fifth, it should be an automatic " I'm guilty " and should be brought up on charges. People have been put into prison with just circumstantial evidence.

Anonymous said...

The fifth by the AG????????


No way.

Anonymous said...

6:57, It is a guilty plea as far as I'm concerned. Incrimination of oneself could only be if one had done something not legal. Absolutely, you are correct.

Anonymous said...

the purpose of the fifth is to shield oneself from saying anything incriminating that could be used to be suspected of committing a crime and therefore doing the work of the police and prosecutors. it's not necessarily an admission of guilt but protection from being suspected of wrongdoing. jails are full of wrongfully convicted people, which we see being released years and decades after their convictions on faulty evidence, which is corrected when new evidence and technologies advance to gain such evidence to correct such miscarriages of justice.