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Tuesday, October 18, 2016

Maryland's use of facial recognition software questioned by researchers, civil liberties advocates

A five-year-old program in Maryland that lets police compare images of unidentified criminal suspects with millions of motor vehicle records using increasingly advanced facial recognition software has come under fire from civil liberties advocates, who say such programs lack transparency and infringe on privacy rights.

Police have used the Maryland Image Repository System with little fanfare since 2011. But the program has attracted increased scrutiny since the American Civil Liberties Union in California released documents last week showing the system was used to monitor protesters during the unrest and rioting in Baltimore last year.

That followed other recent disclosures about law enforcement in Baltimore adopting clandestine technologies, including cellphone tracking and aerial surveillance.

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2 comments:

Anonymous said...

"But the program has attracted increased scrutiny since the American Civil Liberties Union in California released documents last week showing the system was used to monitor protesters during the unrest and rioting in Baltimore last year."

...."protestors" lol

don Skidmore said...

if you ain't breaking the law,what's your worry too many protesters and agitators are staying out of the public eye when they should be punished as much as the ones doing the lawbreaking