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Monday, April 16, 2018

Good Question


14 comments:

Anonymous said...

I don't know. I've wondered that myself. But boy am I glad they did! And thank you to whoever invented the fried oyster fritter. Had 2 at Mt. Hermon Plow Days. OMG so gooooooood!

Anonymous said...

Pre historic natives loved oysters.

Anonymous said...

Bivalves clean the impurities from our water. So that big piece of snot is full of bacteria and waste. And many of you eat them and years later wonder why you end up with cancer or some other disease.

Anonymous said...

Better question is, why does modern, educated man, still eat this snot?

Anonymous said...

7:25 they are filter feeders, meaning they can be cleaned with fresh water. It was likely a similar story to lobster; originally a food for the poor until the wealthier folk caught a taste.

Anonymous said...

8:05 you nailed it. There are no modern, educated men on the shore.

Anonymous said...

Great discovery by whom ever it was! Must be some dumb "city folk" posting the negative comments!

Anonymous said...

@ 7:25 Because it couldn't be the unnatural processed food you eat everyday ?

Anonymous said...

I've said the same thing. Obviously someone very hungry.

Anonymous said...

I wondered the same thing about the first person to eat a crab!

Anonymous said...

If I suggested that you get a bunch of cockroaches and boil them up for a nice snack, would you be repulsed? Probably, but that is what crustaceans are, the cockroaches of the oceans.

Anonymous said...

Probably was the sea gulls that picked them up at low tide and dropped them on the rocks to crack them open and eat them. When the American Indians saw the sea gulls eating the oysters, they decided to try them. It didn't take them long before they figured out that when they were thrown into a fire, they would open up all by themselves, and would be cooked and delicious. Raw ones? They had to be really hungry and without a fire to eat them raw.

Anonymous said...

I've often wondered the same thing.

Also who was the first person to dig up a nasty onion and eat it??

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...
If I suggested that you get a bunch of cockroaches and boil them up for a nice snack, would you be repulsed? Probably, but that is what crustaceans are, the cockroaches of the oceans.

April 16, 2018 at 12:22 PM

No Dumba$$ cockroaches are not crustaceans and nothing like it. You're such an idiot!

Cockroaches are members of the order Blattodea, which includes the termites, a group of insects once thought to be separate from cockroaches. Currently, 4,600 species and over 460 genera are described worldwide. The name "cockroach" comes from the Spanish word for cockroach, cucaracha, transformed by 1620s English folk etymology into "cock" and "roach".[3] The scientific name derives from the Latin blatta, "an insect that shuns the light", which in classical Latin was applied not only to cockroaches, but also to mantids.