Attention

All comments are subject to approval by Moderators. Any off-topic comments will be rejected. Thanks for your cooperation!

Friday, August 11, 2017

Dulles CBP Seizes more than $77k in Unreported Currency

Six Currency Seizures since July 1 Nets Nearly $152k
 
STERLING, Va., — U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers seized $77,586 combined in three seizures of travelers flying international through Washington Dulles International Airport recently for violating federal currency reporting regulations. 
 
CBP officers seized:

  • $20,211 from an Ethiopia-bound couple on Saturday. The couple reported $8,000 and then $11,600; however, a CBP currency canine alerted and CBP officers discovered additional currency in envelopes in a carry-on bag and purse, and in wallets each possessed.
  • $33,796 from a Burundi woman who arrived on a flight from Ghana on July 27. The woman reported $9,000. CBP officers discovered $32,765, 483 Ghanaian Cedi and 50 UAE Dirhams for a total U.S. dollar equivalent of $33,796.
  • $23,579 from a mother and son bound for Sudan on July 24. They verbally reported “less than $10,000,” and then wrote down $9,800. CBP officers discovered an additional $4,000 in a laptop case and multiple envelopes in a purse that contained a combined $10,579 for a total count of $23,579.
During each seizure, CBP officers permitted the travelers numerous opportunities to truthfully report their total currency, including having the travelers read and sign the currency reporting requirements, and make verbal and written declarations before officers conducted inspections.

Travelers may carry as much currency as they wish into and out of the United States. Federal law requires that travelers must report all U.S. and foreign monetary instruments totaling $10,000 or greater on a U.S. Treasury Department financial form. None of the currency is taxed.

“We want travelers to feel comfortable carrying as much currency and other monetary instruments as they wish into and out of the United States, but we encourage travelers to honestly report all their currency to Customs and Border Protection officer during inspection,” said Elmer Jarava, CBP Acting Port Director for the Area Port of Washington Dulles. “We hope that these currency seizures send a strong message about the consequences of violating U.S. currency reporting laws.”

Consequences for violating federal currency reporting requirements are severe. CBP may seize the violator’s currency and file criminal charges, though none of these travelers was criminally charged.

CBP provided each of the travelers a humanitarian monetary release so that they may continue their travel.

CBP officers have recorded several currency seizures recently at Dulles, including more than $48,000 in two seizures and a $25,000 currency seizure during July.

“As the nation’s border security agency, Customs and Border Protection is charged with enforcing hundreds of laws and regulations at our nation’s international ports of entry,” said Casey Owen Durst, CBP’s Field Operations Director in Baltimore, the agency’s operational commander in the mid-Atlantic region. “CBP plays a critical role in helping to keep our communities safe, and it’s a responsibility that we take very seriously.”

Travelers are encouraged to visit CBP’s Travel website to learn more about the CBP admissions process and rules governing travel to and from the U.S.

The Privacy Act prohibits releasing the travelers’ names since they were not criminally charged.

CBP’s Office of Field Operations

Almost a million times each day, CBP officers welcome international travelers into the U.S. In screening both foreign visitors and returning U.S. citizens, CBP uses a variety of techniques to intercept narcotics, unreported currency, weapons, prohibited agriculture, and other illicit products, and to assure that global tourism remains safe and strong.

On a typical day, CBP seizes $289,609 in undeclared or illicit currency along our nation’s borders. Learn more about what CBP did during "A Typical Day" in 2016.

CBP's border security mission is led at ports of entry by CBP officers from the Office of Field Operations. Please visit CBP Ports of Entry to learn more about how CBP’s Office of Field Operations secures our nation’s borders.

Learn more about CBP at CBP.gov.

6 comments:

Anonymous said...

deport forever and take passport.

Anonymous said...

Is the cash amount reported by the U.S. to the government at the destination? Maybe that's where the owners don't want it to be discovered.

Anonymous said...

Sad.
Most Americans don't even understand what is wrong with this law.
It represents a complete lack of freedom to posses property in the United States.

This is why the bankers want to eliminate currency altogether.
So they can completely control us.

I suggest you convert into gold or silver or diamonds or such commodities.
The government will steal every bit of your wealth if you don't protect it.
The government is one big extortion racket - organized crime.

Very sad.
Learn the truth folks.

Anonymous said...

it is designed to combat money laundering, not taking money from people. Now what they do is anyone's guess. But they should have known they were caught and should have fessed up.

Anonymous said...

759
You are either being naive on purpose, or just happen to be naive.
Government is not our friend, and don't give a hoot about protecting us.

Anonymous said...

how is anything he said even remotely naive? He said what the law was designed for but who knows what they do.